All In One Spot

We would like to ensure that your vintage clothes will last you a life time! So, our vintage product pages all include care information for each garment. For washing, drying as well as ironing. We’ve included the guides for each fabric below, with more to come. For a more general guide to vintage clothing care, check out our Vintage Clothing Care Guide.

  • For vintage acrylic, we recommend hand-washing at low temperatures, using a mild detergent.
  • Acrylic’s sturdiness lends itself to being tumble-dried. Use a low temperature setting to avoind wrinkling.
  • Ironing is not usually required. If you ever need to iron acrylic, put the heat on a moderate setting of no higher than 180 °C.

  • Cotton is a forgiving fabric that can be machine-washed. Make sure that the temperature never exceeds 40 °C to keep your clothing from shrinking.
  • Cotton blends tolerate tumble drying at low temperatures, but pure cotton is likely to shrink. In the absence of a label describing the fabric blend, we recommend drying cotton on a rack. Although, avoid contact with direct sunlight since this can lead to discoloration.
  • Being a forgiving fabric, it can handle ironing at a temperature of up to 220 °C.

  • Avoid washing denim as much as you can. Despite its sturdy appearance and feel, it’s prone to not only discoloration but wear too. You can avoid smells by using a fabric spray. Also, use a mild detergent to spot-remove stains. In the rare case where you find yourself needing to wash denim, hand-wash it with mild detergent in lukewarm water.
  • Denim can be tumble-dried at low speed and temperature, but remove the item before the end of the process and lay it flat to dry. This helps to maintain the shape of the denim.
  • You can iron denim at temperatures not exceeding 150 °C using steam. Fortunately, you won’t need to worry about this often because denim rarely needs it.

  • Lace is a delicate fabric that you should handle with utmost care. Always wash it by hand using a mild detergent and keep the water temperature low.
  • Lace cannot be tumble-dried. When drying it, determine whether it’s a light or heavy item. You should lay heavier items down flat to avoid stress from the weight of the water pulling on them. Hang lighter pieces of lace.
  • Avoid ironing lace yourself. Leave any creases and wrinkles to the professionals.

  • Leather should not be machine-washed under any circumstance. Clean it using damp cloth and apply a hydrophobic spray for general maintenance. If you need to clean the item, it’s best left to a professional dry cleaner. Suede also, but you can clean it using a soft brush, using circular motions while applying gentle pressure to avoid damaging the surface.
  • Leather cannot be tumble-dried. Air-dry your leather and suede by hanging it on a rack. Avoid direct sunlight.
  • Leather and suede cannot be ironed.

  • Linen is incredibly fragile. Minimize washing at all costs. But when you do need to wash, hand-wash in cold-to-lukewarm water using a mild detergent.
  • Carefully stretch out the linen by hand to avoid wrinkles. Subsequently, hang it up to dry.
  • Iron carefully on low settings.

  • This is a type of wool, so mohair requires much of the same care. Use cold-to-lukewarm water when hand-washing the item. Make sure that you use a detergent specifically for wool.
  • Lay to dry on a flat surface. Put a towel underneath it to catch any excess moisture.
  • Mohair is too delicate for ironing. Please avoid ironing at all costs.

  • Nylon can handle machine-washing just fine. Just don’t go overboard. Wash at temperatures no higher than 40 °C.
  • This is where nylon shines. Just hang it to dry. It’ll be dry and wearable in no time.
  • Nylon can be ironed on low settings. Avoid using steam.

  • Avoid machine-washing satin. Clean it by hand using a mild detergent at a cold temperature.
  • Satin is not suited for dryers. Lay it flat on a drying rack, approximating its natural shape as closely as possible. Avoid direct sunlight.
  • You can iron satin, but avoid using steam or water since these can stain it. Turn the garment inside out and gently iron the creases with mild pressure. Keep the iron’s temperature low, never exceeding 150 °C.

  • Silk is not suited for machine-washing. Hand-wash only using a mild detergent and cold water.
  • Silk cannot be tumble-dried. Lay it flat on a drying rack in its natural shape and avoid direct contact with sunlight.
  • You can iron silk, but only when the garment is still wet from the washing. Turn it inside out and apply gentle pressure at a lower/moderate temperature, not exceeding 150 °C.

  • Polyester is one of the sturdier materials and can easily handle machine-washing. It’s advised to wash it at a temperature of 40 °C.
  • Polyester’s sturdiness allows it to be dried in any way. Though again, avoid drying in direct sunlight. It tends to dry quickly on its own, but it can be tumble-dried on light-to-medium settings.
  • It’s not prone to wrinkling, so it’s unlikely that you’ll ever need to iron polyester. However, were you to iron it, do so at a lower temperature. No higher than 150 °C.

  • Velvet isn’t an unforgiving fabric. For the best long-term results, it is best to machine-wash at temperatures no higher than 30 °C.
  • Do not tumble-dry. Lay the item flat on a drying rack, retaining its natural shape.
  • Do not iron velvet. Creases are treated by preventing them. Fortunately, velvet does not crease easily.

  • Viscose can be machine-washed with no problem. Make sure you do to not exceed temperatures of 30 °C.
  • Do not tumble-dry. Viscose can be prone to shrinking. Lay it flat on a drying rack.
  • Iron the fabric when it’s still damp or wet. Viscose can handle low-to-medium settings.

  • We recommend washing wool by hand using a special wool detergent in cold-to-lukewarm water. Your washing machine may have a wool setting, but we do not recommend using it for vintage wool.
  • Do not put wool in a dryer. Lay it flat on a towel, outside of direct sunlight. Do not hang it to dry; the damp weight will stretch the fabric, leading to possible tears or a loss of shape.
  • Wool can be ironed, but do not exceed 150 °C.